The Civil War

 Historic homes and gardens crowned by a grand palace, all at North Carolina’s first state capitol. 

 

 

 

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Reenactor and childThis pioneer farmstead, tucked in the beautiful Reems Creek Valley, features a two-story log cabin "mansion," an original 1790s slave cabin, and five outbuildings. Furnished as it would have been in the 1830s, the site explores life in early Buncombe County as seen through the lives of the Vance family and enslaved people.

State Capitol - 1840The North Carolina State Capitol, completed in 1840, is one of the finest and best-preserved examples of a major civic building in the Greek Revival style of architecture. It is a National Historic Landmark. Free admission, donations are accepted and appreciated.

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Slave DwellingsComprises the remains of North Carolina's largest pre-Civil War plantation and one of the South's largest. It once belonged to the Bennehan-Cameron family, whose combined holdings totaled approximately 900 slaves and almost 30,000 acres by 1860.

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Fort FisherUntil the last few months of the Civil War, Fort Fisher kept North Carolina's port of Wilmington open to blockade-runners supplying necessary goods to Confederate armies inland. When Ft. Fisher fell after a massive Federal amphibious assault on January 15, 1865, its defeat helped seal the fate of the Confederacy. Free Admission.

Glimpses into two of our nation's most pivotal wars can be found in one historic site within the city of Kinston. Here you will explore the celebrated life of Richard Caswell, the first governor of the independent state of North Carolina. 

 

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Brunswick Town/Fort AndersonA major pre-Revolutionary port on North Carolina's Cape Fear River, Brunswick was razed by British troops in 1776 and never rebuilt. During the Civil War, Fort Anderson was constructed atop the old village site. Admission free, but donations welcome.

 


Roanoke Island Festival Park is an interactive family attraction that celebrates the first English settlement in America. Visitors board and explore the park's centerpiece, a representational ship, Elizabeth II

 

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Bentonville BattlefieldThe Battle of Bentonville, fought March 19-21, 1865, was the last full-scale action of the Civil War in which a Confederate army was able to mount a tactical offensive. This was the largest ever battle fought in North Carolina. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.

Bennett Place

In April 1865, Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston and Union Gen. William T. Sherman met at Bennett Place, where they signed surrender papers for Southern armies in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.

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