President James K. Polk Historic Site

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The Division of North Carolina State Historic Sites is committed to sharing the stories of members of traditionally marginalized communities whose lives have intersected with our historic sites. We launched the #TrueInclusion initiative to highlight the broad interpretive work already happening at our sites and emphasize our continued goal of sharing an inclusive narrative from the mountains to the coast.

The Division of North Carolina State Historic Sites is committed to sharing the stories of marginalized groups whose lives have intersected with our historic sites. We have launched the #TrueInclusion initiative to highlight the broad interpretive work already happening at our sites and emphasize our continued goal of sharing an inclusive narrative from the mountains to the coast.
Today, the President James K. Polk State Historic Site brings you the start of a new project, The Enslaved Polks. Follow this link to see more: https://buff.ly/3kAW60c
Currently the website includes a partial list of people enslaved by President Polk, a list of people enslaved by the Polk family on the land which is now the President James K. Polk State Historic Site, a timeline with key moments in the enslaved Polks’ lives, information on how to conduct research on enslaved people, and a narrative about the African-American Polks who fought for freedom during the Civil War. 
In future updates, the project will delve into the history of Violet, Lucy, and Elias, who were enslaved by the Polk family on the land that is now the President James K. Polk State Historic Site. These stories reach beyond North Carolina to  President Polk’s plantations in Somerville, TN, and Yalobusha County, MS. These stories are essential to President Polk’s story.

President James K. Polk State Historic Site:
Instagram: @jameskpolkshs
Facebook: @JamesKPolkSHS
YouTube: @President James K. Polk Historic Site